Clinical Trials: Do They Really Work?

The answer, of course, is a resounding “YES”. Clinical trials, aka research studies, aka randomized control trials (RCTs) are one reason for the dramatic increase in life expectancy in the 20th century. Before RCTs, well-meaning scientists and doctors were incorrectly lead to believe their treatments worked by way of wishful thinking and arrogance, according to Simply Statistics.

There are several perks of clinical trial participation which were highlighted in a previous post, Research Study Participation: 5 Benefits to You and Others.

What Is A Clinical Trial?

A clinical trial is a research study conducted in human beings with the goal of answering specific questions about new therapies, vaccines or diagnostic procedures, or new ways of using known treatments. Clinical trials are used to determine whether new drugs, diagnostics or treatments are both safe and effective.

Source: What is a clinical trial and how does a trial work? Roche

How Do Clinical Trials Work?

“If you take part in a clinical trial, you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor’s office. In some ways, taking part in a clinical trial is different from having regular care from your own doctor. For example, you may have more tests and medical exams than you would otherwise.

The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards protect patients and help produce reliable study results.”

To find out more about protocol and eligibility for clinical trials, as well as research study phases, steps to avoid bias, comparison groups, randomization and masking see this article from the National Institutes of Health.

What Can I Do To Get Involved?

Simple! Participate in a research study. Austin area residents with skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis, or rosacea have the opportunity to be involved in the process of discovering new treatments while receiving compensation for time and travel. Inquire about eligibility by calling DermResearch at 512-349-0500 or view our current studies.